Epic

Epic days consist of multi aged classes that means that students are grouped youngest to oldest with similar-aged peers.  The classes are called Aspen, Birch, Cedar and Oak.  The day starts with a lesson on Leadership, followed by our History-based themed lessons which include Stem, Social Studies, Art, Literature studies and Science. We focus on project-based, interactive and engaging lessons that promote critical thinking and discussion.

Epic Supervisor

Nicole loves to bring energy and enthusiasm into the classroom to create a joyful and positive learning environment.  She loves teaching and has cherished her many years teaching in the classroom.  She has taught or coached all ages ranging from Preschool students to University students and everything in between.  She believes that every student has the potential for greatness and that when you believe in a student and set them up for success, they will achieve!  Nicole has a passion for making learning fun and exciting and she loves to hear laughter in the classroom!

nicole.pratt@canyongrove.com

Leadership

Our leadership studies help students to learn how their brain works, teaches them some learning tricks and even helps students train the brain to work more effectively.  Each guidepost is represented through song to help our students remember and take to heart the guideposts and what they represent.

The school mascots Respectful, Responsible and Ready lead the way through our guidepost themes.

I Am Respectful in my words actions and relationships

I Am Responsible to do my best and be my best

I Am Ready to work, learn, and grow.

  1. Seize the Day! – I live mindfully in the present
  2. Own It! – I am responsible for how I act, no matter how I feel.
  3. Words Have Power – I think before I speak
  4. Commit! – I commit to work toward achieving my goals and dreams
  5. Failure Leads to Success – I learn from my mistakes
  6. Honesty is the Best Policy – When I have integrity there’s nothing to fear because I have nothing to hide.
  7. Be Open to Change – My way is not the only way.
  8. Balance – I develop healthy habits and build healthy relationships.
  9. Anything is Possible – I can work hard, dream big, and live a wonderful life.

I Show I’m A Leader By Being Respectful, Responsible, and Ready.

Based upon a foundation of literature and using several other tools of learning including biographies, quotations & discussions, mindfulness exercises, Growth Mindset principles, movement, music, and learning games, our students explore each of these statements and look at how they apply them in their lives. We end the year with the final concept: Anything is Possible. I Will Discover & Create My Best Self to launch them into a summer of discovery and fun.

  

Dive Deeper Sample

Each week we provide you with the highlights of what your child is learning during Epic day.  To continue the learning at home we also provide you with links to additional fun activities.  Help your students to find out more about these fascinating concepts–Go ahead and Dive Deeper!

Actual Dive Deeper lesson plans are found on your students CGA login page.

Week 26: March 8-12, 2021

Historical time period: Pre-Civil War

Leadership:

Guidepost: Balance! I develop healthy habits and build healthy relationships.

3R Connection: I am responsible to develop healthy habits that balance and strengthen my mind, my body, and my relationships with those I love.

Concepts: 

  • America didn’t begin it’s colonization with slavery.  Indentured servants came to American to work off their travel debt but when there weren’t enough indentured servants, plantation owners in the south turned to slavery.
  • Slavery spread across the Southern US affecting all people of color.
  • The slavery issue finally came to a head when the US was no longer able to balance free and slave states coming into the Union and more and more people woke up the evils of slavery.
  • Writing an informative paper takes planning and thinking and can be fun!
  • The Underground Railroad helped slaves escape to the north.
  • Because written maps couldn’t be used, story quilts were used to show the way to freedom.
  • Making a map for someone is about clarity and detail.

Dive Deeper:

  • Heating and Cooling:  Try some of these fun heating and cooling experiments:
    • A great deal of music was created and passed through oral-tradition among the African Americans who lived in slavery. Listen and sing with some of these modern versions of songs that came from their folk culture and longing for freedom.

Week 27: March 22-26 2021

Historical time period: Civil War Begins

Leadership:

Guidepost: Balance! I develop healthy habits and build healthy relationships.

3R Connection: I am ready to determine my priorities and honor the most important  people and opportunities in my life.

Concepts: 

  • There were many reasons for the Civil War other than slavery, but the issue of slavery pushed the country to the tipping point.
  • Pres. Lincoln wanted to keep the country together.
  • The Confederate States of America felt they were doing the same thing America did when breaking free from Great Britain.
  • Clara Barton wanted to help the soldiers so she made sure they had medical supplies and care.  After the war she founded the American Red Cross.
  • Submarines are powerful underwater vessels that help us explore below the water.
  • Submarines have ballasts that can be filled or emptied of water to make the submarine float or sink.  This works on the principle of density.

Dive Deeper:

Skip to My Lou, lyric variations and game instructions

  • Look at 19th Century Embroidery work. 19th Century Embroidery.pdf
    • Learn how to embroider: How to Teach Kids Embroidery (Click on embedded links for more instructions) Do you have any clothing, blankets, pillows, shoes, or pictures you would like to make or embellish, using embroidery?

Week 28: March 29-April 2, 2021

Historical time period: Civil War Ends

Leadership:

Guidepost: Anything is Possible! I can work hard, dream big, and live a wonderful life!

3R Connection: I am respectful of the heroes, teachers, and important people in my life that inspire me to achieve and believe that anything is possible.

Concepts: 

  • The Civil War raged on.  Both sides were Americans, which means that every life lost was an American life.
  • The Battle of Gettysburg in Pennsylvania was the tipping point in the war for the North.  Pres. Lincoln dedicated the cemetery there giving the Gettysburg Address, one of the most important and famous speeches for our country.
  • The war finally ended with Gen. Lee’s surrender at the Appomattox Courthouse in Virginia.
  • Punctuation marks are symbols that tell us how to read a sentence.  They tell us how it should sound when read out loud.
  • Computers do all sorts of complex things for us.  But all that complexity boils down to the very basics of programming 1s and 0s.

Dive Deeper:

  • Learn more about the competition that exists among living things and how it affects an

ecosystem:

Week 29: April 5-9, 2021

Historical time period: Reconstruction

Leadership:

Guidepost: Anything is Possible! I can work hard, dream big, and live a wonderful life!

3R Connection: I am responsible to imagine, create, and live my best life. Anything is possible.

Concepts: 

  • When Lee surrendered to Grant, ending the Civil War, the south lay in ruins because most of the fighting had been in the south.
  • The Freedman Bureau was created to look after the welfare of the freed slaves.  They provided food, helped them find housing and jobs and opened schools to educate them.
  • Kwanzaa is a day each year that African-Americans celebrate their heritage.
  • Juneteenth is the day that the slaves in Texas finally found out they were free after the Civil War ended.
  • Words are classified into different parts of speech.
  • George Washington Carver fought against the odds to get an education, go to college and become a scientist.
  • He introduced crop rotation to the fields in the south and encouraged the growing of peanuts to keep the bugs off the cotton.
  • George Washington Carver invented hundreds of uses for peanuts.

Dive Deeper:

Week 30: April 12-16, 2021

Historical time period: Transcontinental Railroad

Leadership:

Guidepost: Anything is Possible! I can work hard, dream big, and live a wonderful life!

3R Connection: I am ready to make a difference for good. I’ll work hard, dream big, and live a wonderful life.

Concepts: 

  • As more and more people traveled to the west, more efficient ways of travel were needed.
  • Railroads were cheap, dependable and convenient and there became a race to stretch railroad tracks all across the country.  The Transcontinental Railroad was completed in Promontory Point, Utah in 1869.
  • The Pony Express was created to take mail from one side of the country to the other as fast as possible and was successful at getting a letter from St Louis, MO to Sacrameto, CA in 11 days (instead of the 25 days it took by stagecoach) but was quickly replaced by telegraph.
  • Stagecoaches were the best transportation option between towns and through the mountains.  While dusty and uncomfortable, stagecoaches were the safest and fastest way to travel.
  • We can keep records of the things that happen to us in life in a diary.  Diaries from those long ago help us understand how they lived and what life was like back then.

Dive Deeper:

  •  Field Trip Ideas:

Week 31: April 19-23, 2021

Historical time period: Immigration

Leadership:

Guidepost: I Show I’m a Leader When I am Respectful, Responsible, and Ready.

3R Connection: I show I’m a leader when… I am respectful in my words, actions, and relationships. I am ready to work, learn and grow.  I am responsible to do my best and to be my best.

Concepts: 

  • America has always been a land of immigrants.
  • The United States offers a place of refuge, the promise of religious and political freedoms, and the opportunity for a better life.
  • The first thing immigrants saw as they sailed into New York Harbor was the Statue of Liberty.  They then went to Ellis Island to enter the United States.
  • Letters were the only way of communicating across distance for hundreds of years.
  • It’s important to know how to write a friendly letter.
  • The Statue of Liberty is a large statue that stands on Liberty Island in New York Harbor.
  • Copper oxidizes and turns green when it is exposed to air and water for a long time.

Dive Deeper:

  • Visit your local library and select some books about the immigrant experience:

Week 32: April 26-30, 2021

Historical time period: Utah History

Leadership:

Guidepost: Anything is Possible! I can work hard, dream big, and live a wonderful life!

3R Connection: I show I’m a leader when… I am respectful in my words, actions, and relationships. I am ready to work, learn and grow.  I am responsible to do my best and to be my best.

Concepts: 

  • People have lived in the southwestern area of the United States, that we now call Utah, for thousands of years.
  • One of the most influential explorers of Utah was John C. Fremont. He made detailed maps and notes of the territory which was a great help to future settlers.
  • In 1844, the LDS Church decided they needed a new place to live. They chose Utah because there were so few people living here.
  • Utah became a state on January 4, 1896 and was the 45th state in the United States.
  • Writing a persuasive paper takes planning and thought.
  • Using the engineering design process helps break down a large project into manageable steps.

Dive Deeper:

  • One of the best ways of experiencing Native American culture is by listening to their legends. Take a few minutes to share some legends from the Paiute, Ute, and other Utah Native American cultures*. Once you’re done, ask them to get together with a partner and create their own Native American legend!
  • Dominguez & Escalante Exploration Choose your own Adventure Game
  • The Escalante-Dominguez expedition explored south Utah county in search of a path to California in 1776. Father Escalante wrote extensively in his journal, and while standing near the mouth of the canyon in Spanish Fork he declared: The valley was conducive to settlement. The temperature was comfortable day and night. There were four rivers, large meadows for farming, and sufficient fish, fowl and animals for hunting, wood for homes and fires, pasture land for horses and more.  After a meeting with the “fish eating” Utes that populated the shore of Utah Lake, the Spanish explorers “forked” south and headed back to Santa Fe. That is where we get the name Spanish Fork.
    • Visit the Escalante Cross in Spanish Fork.  Here are the instructions.  To start the trail, drive all the way to the Spanish Oaks reservoir and into the Spanish Oaks campground. Park by the pavilion and hike uphill through the campground to the loop at the end. The trail starts off through the trees at the end of the campground loop, and there are a few signs to help. After about 50 yards, there is a trail marker that directs you to turn down the steps to the left.
  • Fathers Dominguez and Escalante were known for keeping a journal of their expedition Santa Fe to Monterey. As one of the first non-Natives on record to step into what is now Utah, they set their eyes on new plants, animals, and geological wonders. They recorded these new sights and more in journals for others to one day read and know what to expect when they came to Utah. Not only did it serve explorers and settlers to come, but Utah was slowly forming an identity, no longer some “western wilderness”. This activity aims to teach students the importance of keeping a journal.  Start an “Explorer’s Journal”. This can be done in their notebooks, or specially compiled pages stapled together. At the start of class during this unit, students must make an entry in their journal about the day’s journey. What kind of adventures did they encounter? Did they meet any Indians? What recommendations can they make to future trappers/settlers about that area?
  • Visit the “This is the Place” monument in Salt Lake City at This is the Place Heritage Park at the mouth of Emigration Canyon.
  • Find stories of pioneers who crossed the plains.  You might even have some in your family history.  Read the stories and imagine what it would be like to be a pioneer.

Week 33: May 3-7, 2021

Historical time period: Industrial Revolution

Leadership:

Guidepost: Anything is Possible! I can work hard, dream big, and live a wonderful life!

3R Connection: I show I’m a leader when …

I am respectful in my words, actions, and relationships.                                                                              I am ready to work, learn and grow.                                                                                              I am responsible to do my best and to be my best.

Concepts:

  • The Industrial Revolution was a time when the making of products moved from small shops and homes to large factories.
  • Some of the most important American inventions during the Industrial Revolution included the telegraph, the sewing machine, telephone, cotton gin, and the practical light bulb.
  • An assembly line is a process for making things where each person does their part and they only do their own part and are very good at it.
  • The inventions during the Industrial Revolution made doing jobs easier.  The inventions helped us have more free time than ever before because we had easier ways to do things and made the United States the most industrialized country in the world.
  • Personification means using human qualities or actions to describe an object to make our writing more interesting.
  • Pulleys can make everyday tasks and large construction projects a lot easier.

Dive Deeper:

  • Simple Machines are often used in all the varieties of work that are done in our modern-day world. Check out some of these fun at-home projects you can do together : 30 Simple Machine Projects for Kids
  • During the industrial revolution you might only think of advances in machinery and technology, but there were other movements going on. These are the Romantic and Realistic movements in Fine Arts.

Romantic Art, Music, and Literature presented a heightened interest in nature,  and gave emphasis to an individual’s expression of emotion and imagination.

Realistic Art focused on presenting common subjects from ordinary and everyday life  in a naturalistic and truthful manner- with little exaggeration or high emotion.

  • Look at these different styles of paintings. Compare Romantic and Realistic works. How are they similar? How are they different?
    • Romanticism: Fine Art: Romanticism Paintings
      • What are the most common subjects and scenes of these paintings?
      • Do any of these paintings have imagination in them? How?
      • Where do your eyes go first when you look at these paintings? Why do you think that happens?
    • Realism: Fine Art: Realism Paintings
      • What are the most common subjects and scenes of these paintings?
      • Do these paintings remind you of photographs? Why or why not?
      • How did the artist’s use of light and shadow affect where you looked in the painting?

When you’re done viewing and talking about the paintings, select a scene or subject you

like and make your own fine art landscape or everyday activity in a Romantic or Realistic

style.

  • The first American sewing machines were created by Walter Hunt in 1832 and Elias Howe in 1846. They were used in factories for sewing blankets and clothing. The sewing machine made the job much faster. All sewing, before this, had been done by hand. It was not until 1889 that a home sewing machine was designed for use in the home. Have fun creating a useful or crafty item using a sewing machine:
  • The 10 Best Sewing Projects for Kids — SewCanShe | Free Sewing Patterns and Tutorials

Week 34: May 10-14, 2021

Historical time period: Industry in Utah

Leadership:

Guidepost: I Show I’m a Leader When I am Respectful, Responsible, and Ready.

3R Connection: I show I’m a leader when… I am respectful in my words, actions, and relationships. I am ready to work, learn and grow.  I am responsible to do my best and to be my best.

Concepts:

  • The 1860s marked a time of progress for the state of Utah when products of the Industrial Revolution arrived and allowed Utah to become more connected to the rest of the country.
  • By 1930, people could travel all the way from New York City to the Pacific Coast in 3-4 days! No longer leaving Utah isolated from the rest of the nation.
  • Most of the industry in early Utah revolved around farming and mining.
  • Mining has been an important part of Utah’s industry since statehood.  Beginning in the late 1800’s Utah saw a large mining boom and mines opened up all over the state.

Dive Deeper:

  • Some would say the mining pay wasn’t bad, and it generally wasn’t. But if it was, say, an immigrant with his family who came looking for a job that was a different story.  By the time immigrants came to town, they were just about out of everything from their long voyage, and were in desperate need of new supplies. They needed food, clothes, shoes, and of course they needed tools to work in the mines. The coal company-owned Company Store would give them all these things and more, including assigning his family a house to live in. The father would go off to the mines, and when pay day came, he would see a big deduction in his check from all the things the Company Store lent him and his family to start out their life in Utah. Oftentimes, their pay would not be enough to cover what they owed, and they would be indebted to the Company Store. Well, by that time, the family was in need of new food, supplies, etc. to sustain them for the next month, and the cycle would start all over again! It was not uncommon for families to constantly be in debt to the company store. Most coal companies had their own money system, and forbid workers from making purchases anywhere other than the Company Store. Quite the monopoly!  Thus we have the song, “Sixteen Tons” made famous by Ernie Ford. Listen to the song here.
  • Visit Promontory Point Utah where the Transcontinental Railroad came together.  Look up instructions online.
  • Write messages to your family or tap them out in Morse Code.  Make it a competition.  Who is the fastest at tapping?  Who is the fastest at interpreting?
  • Make a paper plate seagull.  Why are seagulls important int he sate of Utah?  Why do they live in Utah, so far from the ocean?
  • Make a playdough thunderstorm.
  • Make a cardboard tube bear.  Research all the types of bears that live in Utah.  What do you do when you encounter a bear or camp where there might be bears?